Category Archives: short stories

Revolution and Evolution, the History of the Book

“In around 1440 AD, a goldsmith called Johannes Gutenberg began assembling the apparatus that would eventually become known as the first Western printing press. Thirty years later, this invention had transformed Europe, spiritually, economically and politically. In this episode of Worldview Adam Boulton is joined by Professor Alexander Lee and Professor Emma Smith to chart the history of the book, from its revolutionary beginnings to the present day.”

 

https://engelsbergideas.com/podcast/worldview/worldview-revolution-and-evolution-the-history-of-the-book/

 

This is a fascinating podcast. Apart from the interesting historical background, I was struck by Professor Smith’s comment that a dictator could easily remove e-books from electronic devices whilst it is virtually impossible for a totalitarian regime to track down and destroy all copies of physical books they dislike.

 

I do see advantages to e-books. Indeed, as a visually impaired person who is not able to read print I take advantage of the text to speech facility on the Kindle app in my iPhone to have books read aloud. In addition, all of my titles are available as e-books. However, I also love the physicality of books and most of my titles are also available in paperback format.

A Policeman’s Duty

Sergeant Tom Jenkins paused at the entrance to the churchyard. “Better take a look”, he thought. Not that anyone would be hanging about there on Halloween, (although it was a known haunt of druggies) – but it was freezing, so surely no self respecting crackhead would be loitering there at close to midnight! He chuckled to himself at the thought of a self respecting crackhead and entered the churchyard.

 

Tom’s torch picked out the gravestones as he walked. The graves where, on the whole well cared for. It was a shame that the cemetery was the haunt of junkies and prostitutes who left their needles, condoms and other tools of their trade scattered around for grieving relatives to collect on an almost daily basis. He laughed to himself at “haunt” and quickened his pace desirous to be out of the place.

 

Turning a corner, he stopped abruptly. “are you okay sir?”, he said to the old man who stood with his hands resting lightly on a gravestone.

 

The man raised his head. “Oh yes, I’m fine”.

“Can I help you in any way sir? Its nearly midnight you know?”.

“Oh no thank you officer, I’m just pondering on my next poem”.

“Poem sir? Wouldn’t you be more comfortable at home with a nice hot drink or perhaps something a little stronger?”.

“Do you like poetry officer?”.

“Haven’t read any since I was forced to recite the Charge of the Light Brigade at school”.

 

 

The sergeant turned his collar up against the rising wind. It was strange that his companion, who was dressed in a thin t-shirt and cotton slacks didn’t appear to notice the chill breeze.

 

“We poets gain our inspiration from the natural world, overheard conversations, something we hear on the radio or TV and, of course graveyards. “all lovers must consign to thee and come to dust”.

“Did you write that sir?”.

The poet sighed. “I wish I had. But it was a poet far greater than I ever was”.

“Greater than you ever was?”, the sergeant repeated.

 

“You aint right in the head, you aint!”.

The sergeant spun around to see a girl of 18 or so in cheap heels and a skirt so short it could be mistaken for a belt.

“What!”.

“There aint no one there!”.

 

“Get out of here before I arrest you for soliciting!”.

“That’s harassment that is”. The girl said, but she tottered off in her cheap heels nonetheless.

 

Turning back to the grave where the poet had been standing, the sergeant saw only a weathered old stone.

“Man must have discovered some sense and gone home. A poet! My eye! He must have been waiting for that girl or someone like her”.

 

His cold right hand shook and the torch almost fell from it. Its wavering beam picked out the fading letters on the old gravestone:

“John Smithers, 1900-1980. Poet and artist”.

The torch broke as it hit the ground.

 

Free Book Promotion

My book ‘Samantha’ will be available for free on Kindle from Friday 14th – Tuesday 18th October 2022 here for the UK and here for the US.

Samantha tells a story of a young girl forced into prostitution in the city of Liverpool. Can Sam’s love for Peter, a man she meets in a nightclub, save her? Or will Sam end her life in the murky waters of Liverpool’s Albert Dock?

My book ‘The Suspect and Other Tales’ will be available for free on Kindle from Friday 21st- Tuesday 25th October 2022 here for the UK  and here for the US.

Tales of the unexpected, ranging from stories of crime and vengeance through to ghostly happenings in an ancient mansion.

New TikTok Uploads!

On Wednesday 30th March I read my poetry at The Upper Norwood Library Hub. For links to those readings and other TikTok videos please follow this link:

https://www.tiktok.com/@apollo2362

Free Book Promotion

My books ‘Samantha‘ and ‘The Suspect and other tales‘ are available for free on Amazon!

Samantha‘ will be free to download from Tuesday 20th – Saturday 24th April and can be accessed here for the UK and here for the US

The Suspect and other tales‘ will be free to download from Sunday 25th – Thursday 29th April and can be accessed here for the UK and here for the US

Samantha
Samantha tells a story of a young girl forced into prostitution in the city of Liverpool. Can Sam’s love for Peter, a man she meets in a nightclub, save her? Or will Sam end her life in the murky waters of Liverpool’s Albert Dock?

The Suspect

Tales of the unexpected, ranging from stories of crime and vengeance through to ghostly happenings in an ancient mansion.

Kevin Morris reading his poems ‘Barely a Bird I Heard’ and ‘I Would Rather Be a Tree’ on Youtube

A reading of my poems on Youtube.

February Author Newsletter

I have just published a February author newsletter, which can be viewed here.

The newsletter contains a link to my interview on Vancouver Coop Radio’s The World Poetry Reading Series, which took place on 17th December 2020. In addition, I have included two audio book recommendations, and news of my forthcoming poetry pamphlet.

A Poem from “Dalliance”

The mirror sees it all

The writings on the wall

To the girl he calls

She turns to him and falls

Gazing in the glass

She sees the truth at last

Hides it with a laugh

Would that she could break the glass.

“Mirror” can be found in my collection of poetry and prose “Dalliance”, which can be accessed here, https://www.amazon.com/Dalliance-collection-poetry-prose-Morris-ebook/dp/B00QQVJC7E/

K Morris reading his poem ‘I Heard Leaves Fall’.

K Morris reading his poem ‘I Heard Leaves Fall’.