Category Archives: short stories

Free Book Promotion

My books ‘Samantha‘ and ‘The Suspect and other tales‘ are available for free on Amazon!

Samantha‘ will be free to download from Tuesday 20th – Saturday 24th April and can be accessed here for the UK and here for the US

The Suspect and other tales‘ will be free to download from Sunday 25th – Thursday 29th April and can be accessed here for the UK and here for the US

Samantha
Samantha tells a story of a young girl forced into prostitution in the city of Liverpool. Can Sam’s love for Peter, a man she meets in a nightclub, save her? Or will Sam end her life in the murky waters of Liverpool’s Albert Dock?

The Suspect

Tales of the unexpected, ranging from stories of crime and vengeance through to ghostly happenings in an ancient mansion.

Kevin Morris reading his poems ‘Barely a Bird I Heard’ and ‘I Would Rather Be a Tree’ on Youtube

A reading of my poems on Youtube.

February Author Newsletter

I have just published a February author newsletter, which can be viewed here.

The newsletter contains a link to my interview on Vancouver Coop Radio’s The World Poetry Reading Series, which took place on 17th December 2020. In addition, I have included two audio book recommendations, and news of my forthcoming poetry pamphlet.

A Poem from “Dalliance”

The mirror sees it all

The writings on the wall

To the girl he calls

She turns to him and falls

Gazing in the glass

She sees the truth at last

Hides it with a laugh

Would that she could break the glass.

“Mirror” can be found in my collection of poetry and prose “Dalliance”, which can be accessed here, https://www.amazon.com/Dalliance-collection-poetry-prose-Morris-ebook/dp/B00QQVJC7E/

K Morris reading his poem ‘I Heard Leaves Fall’.

K Morris reading his poem ‘I Heard Leaves Fall’.

Meaning Is In The Eye Of The Reader

In response to a comment by me on her post entitled “The infinity of Destinies”, Veronica comments as follows:

“If I told you my own vision, the mystery would be gone, don’t you agree?”. (see https://thewavesofpoetry.com/2020/07/12/the-infinity-of-destinies-dedicated-to-e/).

As a poet, I do indeed agree with Veronica. Every reader puts his or her own interpretation upon a poem or any other piece of writing. What the creator of art intended is, frequently not what the reader, the viewer of the painting Etc, interprets. And herein resides the joy and beauty of artistic creation.

In my poem “Raining”, I describe awaking to the sound of “rain drumming on my window pane”. On reading “Raining”, a friend’s teenage son commented that he thought the rain was “crying”. This is not something which I (the poet) had ever considered when penning the poem. I can, however understand why my friend’s son interprets “Raining” as he does, and I certainly do not dismiss his interpretation of the poem.

The truth of the matter is this. Once a poem, short story, novel or any other artistic creation is made available to the public, those exposed to it will, inevitably put their own interpretation upon that creation. And they have every right to do so. This is part of the joy of creativity – that it provokes differing interpretations.

As always, I would be interested in the views of my readers.

Kevin

The Suspect and other tales free book deal

My book ‘The Suspect and other tales’ will be available for free from the 14th July – 18th July 2020.

Book Description:

Tales of the unexpected, ranging from stories of crime and vengeance through to ghostly happenings in an ancient mansion.

At Dead of Night

“Dalliance” was the first collection of poetry published by me. Or, to be absolutely accurate, the first collection of poetry (and prose) to be published by mme.

One of the poems appearing in “Dalliance” is entitled “Midnight”

You can find “Dalliance” here, https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/24498367-dalliance, and here https://www.amazon.com/Dalliance-collection-poetry-prose-Morris-ebook/dp/B00QQVJC7E/

A Short History of the Paperback

An interesting history of the paperback book, including information regarding “collectable” paperbacks, https://www.ioba.org/standard/2001/12/a-short-history-of-paperbacks/.

As a child growing up in the city of Liverpool, I well remember a glass bookcase full of paperbacks, in my grandfather’s house in Speke (a suburb of Liverpool).

Most Saturdays my Grandfather and I would go into W. H. Smiths and buy a paperback, often by Enid Blyton, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enid_Blyton.

I lost the majority of my vision at 18-months-old due to a blood clot on the brain. Consequently my grandfather would spend hours reading to me, as I was unable to read print books.

I think of my grandfather whenever I pass by a branch of Smiths. The scent of books and magazines eminating from the store brings the memories flooding back.

Sadly I no longer have the books my grandfather bought for me, Some of which where, no doubt collectable. However, where they still in my possession, I would not part with them as some things possess value which can not be measured in monetary terms.

Samantha by Kevin Morris will be free in the Kindle store!

My book Samantha will be available for free in the Kindle store from Tuesday 16th June until Saturday 20th June.

Samantha tells the story of a young girl forced into prostitution in the city of Liverpool. Can Sam’s love for Peter, a man she meets in a nightclub, save her? Or will Sam end her life in the murky waters of Liverpool’s Albert Dock?

To access the book, please click here for the UK and here for the US.

 

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