Tag Archives: books

One of My Poems from the Poetry Treasures Anthology

Lonely Train is one of my poems included in Poetry Treasures anthology. Below is a video of me reading Lonely Train, followed by links to the Poetry Treasures anthology.

Book Links:
Universal book links https://books2read.com/u/3n7BDR
Amazon https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0933KSJR9

Effect of Producing a Second Edition of a Book on Book Reviews

I am considering revising/extending my “Selected Poems”, as there is new material which I would like to include. Consequently I am thinking of producing a second edition.

I would be grateful for the advice of my readers regarding whether a second edition would mean that the reviews in respect of the current (and only edition) would be lost? Or is it possible to publish a second edition whilst keeping the reviews for the first one?

You can find my “Selected Poems” here, https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07WW8WXPP/

Any advice would be gratefully received.

Kevin

I Started Early – Took My Dog, by Emily Dickinson

I have recently subscribed to the Poetry Foundation’s Audio Poem of the Day. The poem for Monday 6 July is Emily Dickinson’s “I Started Early – Took My Dog”, https://www.poetryfoundation.org/podcasts/75386/i-started-early-took-my-dog-656.

To me, Dickinson’s poem is full of erotic imagery:

“But no Man moved Me – till the Tide
Went past my simple Shoe –
And past my Apron – and my Belt
And past my Boddice – too –

And made as He would eat me up –
As wholly as a Dew
Opon a Dandelion’s Sleeve –
And then – I started – too –

And He – He followed – close behind –
I felt His Silver Heel
Opon my Ancle – Then My Shoes
Would overflow with Pearl –

Until We met the Solid Town –
No One He seemed to know –
And bowing – with a Mighty look –
At me – The Sea withdrew –”.

The above could be read as a description of the sexual act. In particular the poem’s ending, “the sea withdrew” does, I think need no further comment from me.

Dickinson was a deeply religious lady. Yet religion and the erotic are not mutually exclusive. But perhaps my interpretation is wrong, and the poem is what it says it is, a description of a woman’s trip (real or imagined) to the sea, and how the tide nearly overwhelmed her.

I would, as always be interested in the views of my readers.

2 Reviews of My Collection of Poetry, “Light and Shade: Serious (and Not so Serious) Poems

I was delighted to discover that my collection of poetry, “Light and Shade: Serious (and Not so Serious) Poems” has received a further 2 reviews on Goodreads.

Veronika Sizova:

“I have thoroughly enjoyed reading this poetry collection, which has immersed me into a vibrant universe of scintillating humour and alluring melancholy
simultaneously. The bold contrast between the sections “Light” and “Shade” has particularly fascinated me, being reminiscent of the chiaroscuro technique
used by Renaissance artists to accentuate the beauty of their paintings by incorporating the dichotomy of lightness and darkness into their masterpieces.
Kevin Morris has demonstrated exceptional poetic artistry in combining humorous topics with serious themes, such as profound contemplation of human life’s
inevitable evanescence and immortalizing one’s beloved in art.

I would also like to applaud the author for his thoughtfulness and brilliant decision to add footnotes, describing the references he used throughout the
book. An ardent lover of literary allusions, I have particularly enjoyed the poem “The Weather Was Chill,” where Emily Dickinson’s “feathered hope” makes
a flamboyant appearance. It was also my pleasure to find a playful verse referencing “La Belle Dame sans Merci,” which I highly admire.

As Kevin Morris would say, indulging in rhyme is not yet a crime, so don’t hesitate to read his excellent poetry!”.

(For the review please visit, https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/3412806912?book_show_action=true&from_review_page=1.

Audrey Driscoll:

“Section 1 – Love, Nature and Time — comprises poems on themes familiar to those acquainted with Morris’s poetry. The atmosphere is almost uniformly somber,
with occasional touches of wry humour. Appreciation of nature is inevitably paired with awareness of mortality. Desire is of the unfulfilled variety, with
overtones of irony, as in “Escort (an Acrostic),” the final poem of the section.

Similar poems are grouped together; thus, we have five poems featuring autumn leaves and four that mention wind. They are all brief, but almost seem like
different versions of a single poem.

The best of the serious verses have a roundness and a satisfying trajectory. “I Saw a Great Bough,” for example, and “The Sun’s Light Ends in Night.” Others
limp a little. For example, “The Point of Poetry.” “Why must I / Attempt to capture / Every rapture / Or simple pleasure? / The weather / Is there to be
enjoyed, / Be it fine or wet, / Yet.” To my ear, the line “Is there to be enjoyed,” is a bit too long and breaks the rhythm. But perhaps this is intentional,
since the poem’s final line mentions “a poor rhyme.”

Several poems at the end of Section 1 mention the effects of Covid-19. “The Pubs are All Closed,” is the most obvious example, as it expresses regret for
a lost sense of community, even though “girls in short clothes” continue to “go by.”

“Do Good Men Count Sheep?” is interesting. It contains yet another ambiguous reference to women – or rather, to “girls” – who appear often in this collection
as passing by, being glimpsed, or being unavailable.

Section 2, Humour, is considerably longer and a departure from the serious. In fact, many of these short, limerick-like verses are goofy, zany, and downright
bizarre. Here again are groups of similar verses; for example, the set of ten under the title “Miss White.” Each one features a lady by name of White in
a different situation. Many of these verses display a spirit of gleeful naughtiness in keeping with the limerick tradition.

While the limericks adhere to the AABBA rhyme scheme, I did find problems with the rhythm in some cases. Too many syllables in a line causes unexpected
jolts, as in “There Was a Horologist Named Sue.” I must admit that incorporating the word “horologist” into a limerick is a challenge, so perhaps I should
not be too critical.

Quite a few of these short poems are clever and funny. I particularly enjoyed “A Young Lady from France,” “Concrete Poetry,” “Hall’s Ball,” and “There
Once Was a PM Named Boris.”

“Physicists Say” returns to the philosophical, but with a lighthearted tone. Another poem that departs from the limerick form is “Poetry and Prose.” It
neatly sums up a poet’s thoughts about his art.

I recommend Light and Shade to anyone who appreciates short, thoughtful poems. Readers may dip into the serious side if so inclined, or skip over to the
Humour section for a smile and a giggle.”

(For the review please visit, https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/3412237891?book_show_action=true&from_review_page=1).

“Light and Shade” is available in paperback and Kindle and can be found here, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08B37VVKV/.

Poet Kevin Morris holding a copy of his recently published Selected Poems.

My thanks to my friend Shanelle for taking the below photographs, which show me holding a copy of my recently released Selected Poems. For anyone who is visually impaired, the front cover shows a close up image of bluebells in Spa Woods, a wooded area close to the poets home in Upper Norwood. Spa Woods was once part of The Great North Wood, and contains many ancient oaks. The back cover is also shown, and displays a picture of the poet at the entrance to Spa Woods, close to an historic house.

The Selected Poems of K Morris are available in ebook and Paperback here for the UK and here for the US.

 

A Case of Mistaken Identity

A few days back, I received an email from a lady saying how nice it had been to meet me, expressing thanks for looking at her poems and asking if I could please provide her with the telephone number of a MS S. We had, she said met in a pub called The Bull.

All of this was delightful. However, I have no recollection whatsoever of having met the lady in question. I don’t frequent a pub called The Bull and I am not acquainted with MS s!

On receving the email, I had a moment of doubt. Had I, suffered a memory loss, or been in some third dimention! A few seconds thought led to the obvious conclusion that the lady had emailed me in error. She had, I assume met with another poet and wishing to ascertain Ms S’s number had searched online for the poet in question. However, rather than finding her acquaintence she had found one K Morris Poet online, namely myself!

I sent a polite response to my correspondent saying that she had emailed me by mistake and wishing her well with her poems, and that was the end of the matter save for a brief email from the lady apologising for her mistake.

This is not the first time that I have been mistaken for someone other than myself. I have been asked whether I played the piano in a pub I have never drunk in, and been asked if I used to live in an area with which I am unfamiliar. Perhaps I have a long lost twin of whom I am wholly unaware!

Whilst I have never propped up the bar in The Bull, I have, for many years enjoyed the convivial atmosphere in The Railway Bell, https://www.rampubcompany.co.uk/visit-pubs/railway-bell. The Bell has an unofficial lending library where customers can leave books and borrow those left by others. I am delighted that several of my books are on the shelves (you can see my “selected Poems” in the photograph below).

Kevin

Review copies of my “Selectted Poems” will soon be available

Yesterday (6 August), I emailed my “Selected Poems” for final proof reading, (something I always do prior to pressing that “publish” button on Amazon)!

If you are interested in receiving a free (advanced) electronic copy in return for writing an honest review, please contact me at kmorrispoet (at) gmail . com, (the address is rendered thus to defeat spammers)! Please put “Review copy of K Morris Selected Poems” in the subject line of your email.

All being well, my “Selected Poems” will be available in ebook and paperback formats by end August.

Kevin

Copyright Infringement

It is said that “imitation is the sincerest form of flattery”. I was reminded of this much used (and abused) saying when I discovered that someone has (without my permission) uploaded a segment of the audio version of my book, “The Writer’s Pen and Other Poems” to Youtube. This is, of course a clear violation of my copyright and I have, therefore reported the matter to Youtube. (Anyone who finds that their work is appearing, without their permission on Youtube can report copyright violation here, https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/2807622?hl=en-GB. Please note, I have not given the URL containing the infringing material as I do not wish to drive traffic to the infringer’s Youtube channel.

The Writer’s Pen” was published in September 2018, and the audio edition (narrated by Alex Lee, and available from Audible here https://www.audible.com/pd/B07KPN5FCH in November of that same year. As all users of Audible will be aware, anyone considering purchasing a book can, prior to purchasing, listen to a sample of the work in question. In the case of the illegal upload of my copyrighted work, the person uploading “The Writer’s Pen” indicates that the whole book is available (for free). However he (or she) has, in fact uploaded the sample segment of my book and stated that the whole work can be obtained at a site offering audio books. In fact the uploader eroneously names a website (other than Audible), and on investigating the site in question no search results are returned for “The Writer’s Pen”.

As stated at the start of this post, my copyright in “The Writer’s Pen” has been infringed and this issue has been raised with Youtube. I am, however puzzled as to the motives of the uploader. Why should they name an incorrect site as the source for the audio version of my book? Are they, perhaps seeking to drive traffic to that other site in the hope that people will purchase downloads there? I don’t know. However I suspect that this may well be the case.

I also wonder why only the sample segment from Audible was uploaded. In this instance, I suspect the answer is that the uploader did not wish to purchase my book, which they would need to do where they to have uploaded it in it’s entirety. The sample is, however free to access and is, therefore an easy target for anyone wishing to infringe copyright.

I will update this blog when I hear back from Youtube.

Kevin

A Review of My book, “The Writer’s Pen and Other Poems” of

I was delighted to receive a review, on Ink Pantry of my book, “The Writer’s Pen and Other Poems”.

For the review please follow this link, http://www.inkpantry.com/books-from-the-pantry-the-writers-pen-and-other-poems-by-kevin-morris-reviewed-by-giles-l-turnbull/

Kevin

Kevin Morris reading his poem ‘To my dog Trigger, who lay on my book’.

While drinking in my favourite local pub, The Railway Bell (http://www.rampubcompany.co.uk/visit-pubs/railway-bell), I left my rucksack, which contained a copy of my book ‘Lost in the Labyrinth of my mind’ (https://www.amazon.co.uk/Lost-labyrinth-my-mind-Morris-ebook/dp/B01AF5EPVY) on the floor. My guide dog Trigger made himself comfortable on both book and rucksack, creasing ‘Lost’s pages, which led to the composition of this poem.

The poem can be found in Refractions: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Refractions-K-MORRIS-ebook/dp/B01L5UC2H2/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1488112246&sr=1-1&keywords=refractions+k+morris