Tag Archives: reading

January Author Newsletter

I’m pleased to announce my January Author Newsletter is available to read/subscribe. To do so please follow this link:

https://mailchi.mp/c79480b645b0/january-author-newsletter

Today is World Braille Day

Today (4 January) is World Braille Day, https://www.un.org/en/observances/braille-day.

I have been a braille user since approximately 5 years of age.

Braille is made by punching dots into paper or other materials. For example, when you next go shopping you may well come across braille on bottles of bleach or other cleaning products. In addition, many medications now have braille labels enabling people such as myself to identify them.

As a child who was unable to read print, braille was one of the main ways in which I accessed the printed word. I can still remember the first fully contracted (grade 2 braille) book I read. It was entitled The Story of Pets, and being able to access it independently of sighted assistance gave me a profound sense of achievement.

Despite the massive advances in technology (for instance the availability of text to speech on almost all titles in the Amazon Kindle store which enables those unable to read print to access them), braille still remains extremely important.

As mentioned above, braille enables visually impaired people to identify household cleaning products such as bleach. In addition, I continue to read braille books. Whilst I gain enjoyment from listening to audio downloads (for example of poetry books), the advantage to braille (as with print) is that it enables readers to put their own interpretation upon a work, rather than being influenced by the person narrating the audio book. I come across some readings and think to myself “that is not how I imagine the poem/other work in question should be read/interpreted”).

A number of my own books are available in braille from the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), https://kmorrispoet.com/2020/06/23/braille-editions-of-my-books/. In addition, all of my works in the Kindle store have text to speech enabled, enabling those who are unable to read print to access them.

In conclusion, braille remains a vital means for braille readers to access information and to enjoy the written word in the form of literature. Braille displays can be linked to a computer allowing braille users to read the contents of the screen, https://www.rnib.org.uk/sight-loss-advice/technology-and-useful-products/technology-resource-hub-latest-facts-tips-and-guides/braille-displays-and-notetakers. Consequently braille will, I believe remain relevant for many years to come.

Volumes Fill My Room

Volumes fill my room.
A girl’s sweet perfume
May make me smile
For a little while.

Poetry survives, our brief lives.
Whilst the linger of fingers
From the present time,
Are caught in rhyme

Poetry Treasures Anthology

I am delighted to be able to announce that I have been included in the Poetry Treasures anthology.

Book Description:

A collection of poetry from the poet/author guests of Robbie Cheadle on the “Treasuring Poetry” blog series on Writing to be Read in 2020. Open the book
and discover the poetry treasures of Sue Vincent, Geoff Le Pard, Frank Prem, Victoria (Tori) Zigler, Colleen M. Chesebro, K. Morris, Annette Rochelle Aben, Jude Kitya Itakali, and Roberta Eaton Cheadle.

Book Links:

Universal book links https://books2read.com/u/3n7BDR
Amazon https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0933KSJR9

Free Book Promotion

My books ‘Samantha‘ and ‘The Suspect and other tales‘ are available for free on Amazon!

Samantha‘ will be free to download from Tuesday 20th – Saturday 24th April and can be accessed here for the UK and here for the US

The Suspect and other tales‘ will be free to download from Sunday 25th – Thursday 29th April and can be accessed here for the UK and here for the US

Samantha
Samantha tells a story of a young girl forced into prostitution in the city of Liverpool. Can Sam’s love for Peter, a man she meets in a nightclub, save her? Or will Sam end her life in the murky waters of Liverpool’s Albert Dock?

The Suspect

Tales of the unexpected, ranging from stories of crime and vengeance through to ghostly happenings in an ancient mansion.

April Author Newsletter

I have just uploaded my April Author Newsletter which can be found here.

Dogs in Literature

A fascinating post on the blog Interesting Literature about the symbolism of dogs in literature, https://interestingliterature.com/2021/03/dogs-symbolism-in-literature-and-myth-meaning-analysis/.

I have myself composed a number of poems about my former (and still very much missed) guide dog Trigger, including this one entitled “To a Departed Dog”:

“Sometimes I see
You in front of me,
Or imagine you at
My side. I
Go to pat
You under the table,
Where you so often sat.
I am not able.
You are not coming back.”

(“To a Departed Dog” appears in “The Further Selected Poems of K Morris”, which can be found here, https://www.amazon.com/Further-Selected-Poems-Morris-ebook/dp/B08XPMGD3F).

Photographs of Poet K Morris holding the paperback edition of his book, The Further Selected Poems of K Morris

On Friday I received author copies of my book, The Further Selected Poems of K Morris , which was published on 27th February. The photographs below show me holding the front and back cover of my book, as well as two poems from the collection; ‘Dog Bed’ and ‘To a Departed Dog’. My book is also available as a Kindle download, and can be found here

For the UK please visit here and for the US please visit here

Statue of Poet Philip Larkin Placed on Secret Racism Reviews List

An article in The Telegraph says that the statue of the poet Philip Larkin in Hull has been placed on a secret racism review’s list following Black Lives Matter protests.

In his letters, Larkin made racist comments, which has caused the poet’s statue to be placed on the review list.

The article states that emails from those employed by the Council have argued that the statue should stay, and I would be astounded if Larkin is removed from public view.

In my view, a poet’s (or any other literary person’s views) should not disqualify them from being honoured by a statue. It is the quality of a poet’s work on which they should be judged. One may condemn the opinions of an individual (I do not agree with Larkin’s views on race), whilst celebrating their literary greatness.

Amongst my favourite Larkin poems, are Aubade and Ambulances. His description in the former poem of why so many people fear death is masterful and it is a poem to which I often return.

To read the article, (which is behind a paywall) please follow this link, https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2021/03/06/philip-larkin-statue-placed-secret-racism-reviews-list-following/.

March Author Newsletter

Kevin’s March Author Newsletter:

I am pleased to announce that my March Author Newsletter is available one day early! To read my latest newsletter please click here.