Revolution and Evolution, the History of the Book

“In around 1440 AD, a goldsmith called Johannes Gutenberg began assembling the apparatus that would eventually become known as the first Western printing press. Thirty years later, this invention had transformed Europe, spiritually, economically and politically. In this episode of Worldview Adam Boulton is joined by Professor Alexander Lee and Professor Emma Smith to chart the history of the book, from its revolutionary beginnings to the present day.”

 

https://engelsbergideas.com/podcast/worldview/worldview-revolution-and-evolution-the-history-of-the-book/

 

This is a fascinating podcast. Apart from the interesting historical background, I was struck by Professor Smith’s comment that a dictator could easily remove e-books from electronic devices whilst it is virtually impossible for a totalitarian regime to track down and destroy all copies of physical books they dislike.

 

I do see advantages to e-books. Indeed, as a visually impaired person who is not able to read print I take advantage of the text to speech facility on the Kindle app in my iPhone to have books read aloud. In addition, all of my titles are available as e-books. However, I also love the physicality of books and most of my titles are also available in paperback format.

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11 thoughts on “Revolution and Evolution, the History of the Book

  1. Liz Gauffreau

    I’m particularly struck by this quote: “a dictator could easily remove e-books from electronic devices whilst it is virtually impossible for a totalitarian regime to track down and destroy all copies of physical books they dislike.”

    Reply
    1. K Morris Poet Post author

      I’m interested that you are struck by the same point that struck me,Liz. There has been too much book burning by Nazis, Communist and other unsavoury regimes. Best wishes. Kevin

      Reply
    2. K Morris Poet Post author

      I have heard something of the book banning movement in the USA, but have little information about it. I have heard of some “Christians” calling for what they perceive as anti-Christian books to be removed from school libraries, for example those promoting Darwin’s evolutionary theories. If one disagrees with a book/the ideas it promotes, then one has the right in a free society to argue against those ideas, but the right to freedom of speech/the freedom to read must be protected.

      Reply

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