Tag Archives: ghost stories

Free Book Promotion

My books ‘Samantha‘ and ‘The Suspect and other tales‘ are available for free on Amazon!

Samantha‘ will be free to download from Tuesday 20th – Saturday 24th April and can be accessed here for the UK and here for the US

The Suspect and other tales‘ will be free to download from Sunday 25th – Thursday 29th April and can be accessed here for the UK and here for the US

Samantha
Samantha tells a story of a young girl forced into prostitution in the city of Liverpool. Can Sam’s love for Peter, a man she meets in a nightclub, save her? Or will Sam end her life in the murky waters of Liverpool’s Albert Dock?

The Suspect

Tales of the unexpected, ranging from stories of crime and vengeance through to ghostly happenings in an ancient mansion.

Meet Father Merton, a character in Through the Nethergate

Father Merton is a Catholic priest who grew up on a diet of Norse mythology and Scandinavian folklore emanating from his mother’s side of the family who lived in Norway. His background and continuous exposure to superstition and mythical beliefs have resulted in him having a much more open mind about such matters than his colleagues who have grown up in a much more science focused world. Father Merton considers situations from all perspectives and applies all his senses, including a highly developed sixth sense.

Following his own encounter with a spirit as a young priest, Father Merton made a career choice to become an exorcist within the structure of the Catholic Church. During his career as an exorcist, he has interacted with plenty of charlatans who were putting on a fine show of being haunted, but he has also come across several genuine hauntings.

“As he drove along a stretch of the road lined on both sides by tall trees, he happened to glance into his rear-view mirror. In the moonlight he saw a teenage girl sitting in the back of his car.

He assumed she was the daughter of one of the Catholic families who had attended the service and his initial reaction was one of irritation. Why had she stowed away in his car? Was she running away from home?

He swung around to look at the teenager over his shoulder, but there was no-one there.
A few seconds later, he looked in the rear-view mirror again and the girl was back. Her skin shone whitely although he couldn’t see her face clearly in the dim light. He swung around for a second time and his annoyance intensified when he saw she was gone again. Why was she ducking down behind the seat when he turned to look at her? It was such a childish thing to do.
He slammed on the brakes and climbed out of the driver’s seat of the car. Marching around to the back door he flung it open, intending to give the girl a good telling off, but there was no-one there. The car was completely empty.

She couldn’t possibly have jumped out of the car and run away; he would have seen her.
He shut the back door and walked back to the driver’s door. Taking his seat, he again peered into the rear-view mirror. The girl was back. She was sitting serenely in the back seat, hands folded neatly on her lap.

He drove off, heart hammering in his chest. When he checked the rear-view mirror again, about a mile further down the road, the girl was gone.” – Extract from Through the Nethergate
Father Merton is introduced into Through the Nethergate by Father Muike, the Catholic priest, who is Grandfather’s confidant and friend. Grandfather turns to Father Muike for help after his own unfortunate encounter with the phantom carriage containing the poltergeist relatives of Hugh Bigod, who have haunted a route through Bungay and its surrounds and back to Bungay Castle for centuries.

“A phantom coach drawn by four horses thundered down the road. Plumes of Hellfire poured from the horses’ mouths and nostrils, creating a blazing red glow in the misty darkness. Sparks flew as the horses’ hooves struck the tarmac. A headless coachman, with his white, bloodless head tucked under his arm, drove the coach.

Hanging out of the coach windows were four ghostly figures. They were wearing tunics and cloaks, which he recognised as being the fashion of the 12th century. Their faces wore expressions of deep discontent and their eyes were piggy and mean. Next to the coach loped a huge, shaggy black dog with red eyes that shone like headlamps in the gloom. The dog was heavy and solid.” – extract from Through the Nethergate

Grandfather asks Father Muike to come to the Inn and perform an exorcism to rid it of the malevolent dark incarnates whom Margaret’s powers have aroused. Father Muike explains to Grandfather that he cannot perform an exorcism, although he can be in attendance to support the exorcist. An exorcism can only be performed by a priest who has been appointed to the ministry of exorcism and has had the necessary training. Father Muike contacts his old friend Father Merton, knowing that he has performed exorcisms in the past. After hearing the facts and circumstances, Father Merton agrees to come to Bungay and assist in riding the Inn and the town of Hugh Bigod’s and all of his ghostly servant’s evil influences.

“The driver must have had incredible strength to control them and keep them from bolting. His severed head was tucked under his arm. His great arms were flailing around so much, trying to control the horses, that I thought it would fall and bounce away down the road.”

The Blurb

Can one girl banish evil?

Margaret, a girl born with second sight, has the unique ability to bring ghosts trapped between Heaven and Hell back to life. When her parents die suddenly, she goes to live with her beloved grandfather, but the cellar of her grandfather’s ancient inn is haunted by an evil spirit of its own.

In the town of Bungay, a black dog wanders the streets, enslaving the ghosts of those who have died unnatural deaths. When Margaret arrives, these phantoms congregate at the inn, hoping she can free them from the clutches of Hugh Bigod, the 12th century ghost who has drawn them away from Heaven’s White Light in his canine guise.

With the help of her grandfather and the spirits she has befriended, Margaret sets out to defeat Hugh Bigod, only to discover he wants to use her for his own ends – to take over Hell itself.

A clever melding of fiction and historical facts.

About Robbie Cheadle and Roberta Eaton Cheadle

Robbie, short for Roberta, is an author with six published children’s picture books in the Sir Chocolate books series for children aged 2 to 9 years old (co-authored with her son, Michael Cheadle), one published middle grade book in the Silly Willy series and one published preteen/young adult fictionalised biography about her mother’s life as a young girl growing up in an English town in Suffolk during World War II called While the Bombs Fell (co-authored with her mother, Elsie Hancy Eaton). All of Robbie’s children’s book are written under Robbie Cheadle and are published by TSL Publications.

Robbie has recently branched into adult horror and supernatural writing and, in order to clearly differential her children’s books from her adult writing, these will be published under Roberta Eaton Cheadle. Robbie has two short stories in the horror/supernatural genre included in Dark Visions, a collection of 34 short stories by 27 different authors and edited by award winning author, Dan Alatorre as well as three short stories in murder mystery short story collection, Death Among Us, edited by Stephen Bentley. These short stories are published under Robbie Cheadle.

Through the Nethergate, a supernatural/horror book that is due to be released in September 2019, will be the first book published under the name of Roberta Eaton Cheadle.

Robbie has also recently published a poetry collection, Open a new door, together with fellow South African poet, Kim Blades.

Follow Robbie Cheadle at:

Blog: https://bakeandwrite.co.za/
Blog: https://robbiesinspiration.wordpress.com/blog/
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/15584446.Robbie_Cheadle
Facebook: @SirChocolateBooks
Twitter: @bakeandwrite

Follow Roberta Eaton Cheadle at:

Twitter: https://twitter.com/RobertaEaton17
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/robertawrites/
Blog: https://robertawrites235681907.wordpress.com

Purchase all Robbie and co-author’s Books from:

https://www.amazon.com/author/robbiecheadle
OR
http://tinyurl.com/zdokqjr

The Grey Lady Of Allerton Tower

Today I visited the ruins of Allerton Towers, in the company of my mum, her partner and the 2 dogs. On returning to my mum’s home and feeling curious regarding the ruined mansion, I Googled Allerton Towers and came across this ghost story pertaining to “The Grey Lady”, who is reputed to haunt the old house and grounds, (http://www.slemen.com/allertontower.html). I am sorry to say we saw only dogs and their owners during our walk, no “Grey Lady” did we spy. The above story does, none the less make for interesting reading.

Kevin

‘The Suspect and other tales’ by K. Morris – Free book promotion

My collection of short stories, ‘The Suspect and other tales’ is free in the Kindle store from March 4th – March 8th 2015.

The book consists of: Tales of the unexpected, ranging from stories of crime and vengeance through to ghostly happenings in an ancient mansion.

One reviewer of ‘The Suspect’ writes as follows: ‘Eleven clever and entertaining short stories, ideal for dipping into and each with a nice twist in the tale.’

To download ‘The Suspect’ free in the UK please visit http://www.amazon.co.uk/Suspect-other-tales-K-Morris-ebook/dp/B00PKPTQ0U/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8 or http://www.amazon.com/Suspect-other-tales-K-Morris-ebook/dp/B00PKPTQ0U/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8 for the US

Disquiet By A P Bullard: Book Review

“Disquiet”, an anthology by A P Bullard and other writers was well worth the £0.99 I paid for the book in the Amazon Kindle store. While not all of the stories produced in me a feeling of disquiet, the majority of the tales had me on the edge of my seat (or bed as I finished the book in my bedroom), wondering about the fate of the characters.

The story which especially horrified me concerned a man who chooses to gouge out his eyes. The author describes with clinical precision, down to the instruments employed, how the unnamed man goes about accomplishing this gruesome task. As someone who lost the majority of my sight as a very small child due to a blood clot I find it hard to grasp why anyone would, voluntarily gouge out their own eyes. However there are psychologically disturbed people out there and the story held me spellbound (that probably is a bad choice of words but I can not, at this juncture think of a better one) with a sense of horrified fascination.

The other tale which particularly intrigued me concerns a group of 3 disreputable characters in an inn. It is the well established story of those perpetually doomed by a demonic presence to repeat an action (in this case the opening of a box) with no possibility of redemption.

For anyone who enjoys uncomfortable reads I recommend “Disquiet” which can be downloaded here (http://www.amazon.com/Disquiet-anthology-A-P-Bullard-ebook/dp/B00OQJGU0K) or here (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Disquiet-anthology-P-Bullard-ebook/dp/B00OQJGU0K/ref=sr_1_2?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1423812600&sr=1-2&keywords=Disquiet%3A+an+anthology).

The Suspect And Other Tales By K Morris: Book Review

On checking the reviews of my book, “The Suspect And Other Tales” I noticed that a new review was posted on 4 February, (http://www.amazon.com/review/RM3GJSO629L91/ref=cm_cr_rdp_perm?ie=UTF8&ASIN=B00PKPTQ0U).

Many of the stories in “The Suspect And Other Tales are in the crime genre and have an unexpected twist in the tale. Other stories concern ghostly happenings. In “Something Wicked” a young boy is subjected to a haunting in an ancient mansion. Are his terrifying experiences the product of an overactive imagination or does something truly wicked lurk in the dark shadows of his chamber?

For “The Suspect And Other Tales” please visit http://www.amazon.com/The-Suspect-other-tales-Morris-ebook/dp/B00PKPTQ0U/ref=cm_rdp_product or http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Suspect-other-tales-Morris-ebook/dp/B00PKPTQ0U

Free Book Promotion – Sting in the tail

Sting in the tail is free in the Amazon Kindle store from the 22nd – 26th January 2015.

To download Sting in the tail for the UK please visit http://www.amazon.co.uk/Sting-tail-other-stories-Morris-ebook/dp/B00DFK6R54 or http://www.amazon.com/Sting-tail-other-stories-Morris-ebook/dp/B00DFK6R54 for the US

If you download Sting in the tail or any of my other books please do consider leaving a review on Amazon and/or your own website.

To visit my Amazon author page please visit http://www.amazon.co.uk/K.-Morris/e/B00CEECWHY/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_pop_1 for the UK or http://www.amazon.com/K.-Morris/e/B00CEECWHY/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_pop_1 for the US

A 4 Star Review Of My Collection Of Short Stories, The Suspect And Other Tales

A great 4 star review of my collection of short stories, The Suspect And Other Tales,

 

“I, too, enjoyed these stories. Short but tasty morsels that dont fill you up but yet leave you satisfied!”. My thanks goes to the reviewer for taking the time to write a review. For the review please visit the following link (http://www.amazon.com/review/R5ZYKHOEVDT3L/ref=cm_cr_rdp_perm?ie=UTF8&ASIN=B00PKPTQ0U). To download The Suspect And Other Tales please visit the following links, (http://www.amazon.com/The-Suspect-other-tales-Morris-ebook/dp/B00PKPTQ0U/ref=cm_rdp_product, for the US or http://www.amazon.co.uk/Suspect-other-tales-K-Morris-ebook/dp/B00PKPTQ0U/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1417268733&sr=1-1&keywords=The+Suspect+and+other+tales, for the UK).

Free Book Promotion – The Suspect and other tales by K. Morris

My collection of short stories ‘The suspect and other tales’ will be available to download for free on Kindle from the 25th – 29th November.

A reviewer has written of ‘The Suspect’ as follows: ‘Eleven clever and entertaining short stories, ideal for dipping into and each with a nice twist in the tale.’ You can see the review here: http://www.amazon.co.uk/product-reviews/B00PKPTQ0U/ref=dp_top_cm_cr_acr_txt?ie=UTF8&showViewpoints=1

To download The Suspect and other tales free please visit: http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Suspect-other-tales-Morris-ebook/dp/B00PKPTQ0U for the UK or here http://www.amazon.com/The-Suspect-other-tales-Morris-ebook/dp/B00PKPTQ0 for the US

For my Amazon Author page please visit http://www.amazon.co.uk/K-Morris/e/B00CEECWHY/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1 for the UK and http://www.amazon.com/K-Morris/e/B00CEECWHY/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1 for the US

If you download any of my books I would appreciate it if you would please consider leaving a review.

Many thanks, Kevin

The Raven By Edgar Alan Poe

An excellent short essay on the site, Interesting Literature regarding Edgar Alan Poe’s poem, The Raven (http://interestingliterature.com/2014/11/15/guest-blog-the-raven-nevermore/). The post’s author rightly sees the raven as the personification of melancholy and death.

 

The Raven plays a pivotal role in my story, “Something Wicked”, which appears in my latest collection of short stories, “The Suspect And Other Tales”, (http://www.amazon.com/The-Suspect-other-tales-Morris-ebook/dp/B00PKPTQ0U). In “Something Wicked”, a young boy, Charles becomes obsessed by the Raven with the bird worming it’s way into his nightmares. Is the knocking which Charles hears produced by the sinister raven or is the sound a mere figment of his imagination?

 

 

The Raven By Edgar Alan Poe

 

Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,

Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore—

While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,

As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door.

“’Tis some visitor,” I muttered, “tapping at my chamber door—

Only this and nothing more.”

Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December;

And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor.

Eagerly I wished the morrow;—vainly I had sought to borrow

From my books surcease of sorrow—sorrow for the lost Lenore—

For the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore—

Nameless here for evermore.

And the silken, sad, uncertain rustling of each purple curtain

Thrilled me—filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before;

So that now, to still the beating of my heart, I stood repeating

“’Tis some visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door—

Some late visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door;—

This it is and nothing more.”

Presently my soul grew stronger; hesitating then no longer,

“Sir,” said I, “or Madam, truly your forgiveness I implore;

But the fact is I was napping, and so gently you came rapping,

And so faintly you came tapping, tapping at my chamber door,

That I scarce was sure I heard you”—here I opened wide the door;—

Darkness there and nothing more.

Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing,

Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before;

But the silence was unbroken, and the stillness gave no token,

And the only word there spoken was the whispered word, “Lenore?”

This I whispered, and an echo murmured back the word, “Lenore!”—

Merely this and nothing more.

Back into the chamber turning, all my soul within me burning,

Soon again I heard a tapping somewhat louder than before.

“Surely,” said I, “surely that is something at my window lattice;

Let me see, then, what thereat is, and this mystery explore—

Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore;—

’Tis the wind and nothing more!”

Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter,

In there stepped a stately Raven of the saintly days of yore;

Not the least obeisance made he; not a minute stopped or stayed he;

But, with mien of lord or lady, perched above my chamber door—

Perched upon a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door—

Perched, and sat, and nothing more.

Then this ebony bird beguiling my sad fancy into smiling,

By the grave and stern decorum of the countenance it wore,

“Though thy crest be shorn and shaven, thou,” I said, “art sure no craven,

Ghastly grim and ancient Raven wandering from the Nightly shore—

Tell me what thy lordly name is on the Night’s Plutonian shore!”

Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.”

Much I marvelled this ungainly fowl to hear discourse so plainly,

Though its answer little meaning—little relevancy bore;

For we cannot help agreeing that no living human being

Ever yet was blessed with seeing bird above his chamber door—

Bird or beast upon the sculptured bust above his chamber door,

With such name as “Nevermore.”

But the Raven, sitting lonely on the placid bust, spoke only

That one word, as if his soul in that one word he did outpour.

Nothing farther then he uttered—not a feather then he fluttered—

Till I scarcely more than muttered “Other friends have flown before—

On the morrow he will leave me, as my Hopes have flown before.”

Then the bird said “Nevermore.”

Startled at the stillness broken by reply so aptly spoken,

“Doubtless,” said I, “what it utters is its only stock and store

Caught from some unhappy master whom unmerciful Disaster

Followed fast and followed faster till his songs one burden bore—

Till the dirges of his Hope that melancholy burden bore

Of ‘Never—nevermore’.”

But the Raven still beguiling all my fancy into smiling,

Straight I wheeled a cushioned seat in front of bird, and bust and door;

Then, upon the velvet sinking, I betook myself to linking

Fancy unto fancy, thinking what this ominous bird of yore—

What this grim, ungainly, ghastly, gaunt, and ominous bird of yore

Meant in croaking “Nevermore.”

This I sat engaged in guessing, but no syllable expressing

To the fowl whose fiery eyes now burned into my bosom’s core;

This and more I sat divining, with my head at ease reclining

On the cushion’s velvet lining that the lamp-light gloated o’er,

But whose velvet-violet lining with the lamp-light gloating o’er,

She shall press, ah, nevermore!

Then, methought, the air grew denser, perfumed from an unseen censer

Swung by Seraphim whose foot-falls tinkled on the tufted floor.

“Wretch,” I cried, “thy God hath lent thee—by these angels he hath sent thee

Respite—respite and nepenthe from thy memories of Lenore;

Quaff, oh quaff this kind nepenthe and forget this lost Lenore!”

Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.”

“Prophet!” said I, “thing of evil!—prophet still, if bird or devil!—

Whether Tempter sent, or whether tempest tossed thee here ashore,

Desolate yet all undaunted, on this desert land enchanted—

On this home by Horror haunted—tell me truly, I implore—

Is there—is there balm in Gilead?—tell me—tell me, I implore!”

Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.”

“Prophet!” said I, “thing of evil!—prophet still, if bird or devil!

By that Heaven that bends above us—by that God we both adore—

Tell this soul with sorrow laden if, within the distant Aidenn,

It shall clasp a sainted maiden whom the angels name Lenore—

Clasp a rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore.”

Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.”

“Be that word our sign of parting, bird or fiend!” I shrieked, upstarting—

“Get thee back into the tempest and the Night’s Plutonian shore!

Leave no black plume as a token of that lie thy soul hath spoken!

Leave my loneliness unbroken!—quit the bust above my door!

Take thy beak from out my heart, and take thy form from off my door!”

Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.”

And the Raven, never flitting, still is sitting, still is sitting

On the pallid bust of Pallas just above my chamber door;

And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon’s that is dreaming,

And the lamp-light o’er him streaming throws his shadow on the floor;

And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor

Shall be lifted—nevermore!