Author Archives: K Morris Poet

About K Morris Poet

The purpose of this website (kmorrispoet.com) is to showcase my writing. For details of my published works, please click on the 'About' page of my blog.

When A Politician Named Matt

When a politician named Matt
Maintained he never said that,
And they showed him the proof
He said, “I always tell the truth,
And the earth ’tis undoubtedly flat!”.

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When A Young Lady Whose Name Is Fay

When a young lady whose name is Fay
Wore a short dress one hot summer’s day,
A vicar called Heart,
Who loved his art
Said, “Fay, would you model for me today?”

A Tree Grows

A tree grows
It’s branches entwining
With another tree,
Forming a canopy
Under which pass
A lad and his lass.

Seasons pass
And sapplings grow to maturity,
While the lad and lass
We did see
Forever lie
Under sky and tree.

When A Young Lady Whose Name Is Kate

When a young lady whose name is Kate
Invited me out on a hot curry date,
I enjoyed lots of spice,
Which was more than nice,
But that’s enough about that young lady Kate!

Interview with Poet and Author Gabriela M

I am honoured to post the below interview with Gabriela M, a writer I greatly admire, and I’m extremely grateful to Gabriela for her kind words regarding my own work. You can find Gabriela M online here, https://shortprose.blog/

1. What is the first book you remember having read?

Kevin, before I answer your questions allow me to thank you for this interview. I greatly admire your poetry. I am honored to be your guest.

The first book I remember reading apart from Snow White and other children’s books is Jules Verne’s Around the World in Eighty Days. I was fascinated by it.

2. In relation to question 1, What impression did the book make on you?

It had quite an effect on my life. I was very young when I read it. After reading it I got this idea that I must travel to see the world. The desire to see the world caused me to attempt to run away from home.

My parents loved me very much. I had a happy childhood. Can you imagine my parents’ shock when I first ran away from home? I was a little girl walking the streets by myself, talking to myself, and marveling at every new thing I saw. The police found me not too far from our home. Even though my parents started to lock the front yard gate I managed to do it again. My mother asked me why I was doing it. I don’t remember what I answered. According to her my response was invariable: “I want to see the world like those guys in that book.”

Until this day my desire to see the world is still alive. There are quite a few countries to which I still have yet to travel. However, today I know that it’s not only about seeing the world. It’s also about looking for something, something that I cannot define. It is an externalization of that for which my soul still looks.

3. Do you recall your first literary composition and, if so can you describe it?
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My first novel. One morning, out of the blue, I told my mother: “I am going to write a book.” She looked at me incredulously. Anyway, the book has two plans: one reflects the experience of traveling; the other a night conversation with one of my friends. It’s like watching two movies at the same time.

The scenes alternate with apparently no connection. After I finished, I did not have a title and I had no idea what to do with the manuscript. My mother, who read every page and honestly marveled at my writing – well, after all she was my mother – took the manuscript and sent it to a publisher. I got a simple reply: “I am publishing, and I have a title for you.”

The preface was written by an university professor. It was very laudatory. I was very grateful, yet ready to move on. However, one thing written in that preface stayed with me: “This book urges us to find an answer to an important question: Quels sentiments combleront jamais l’existence inexistante des hommes de notre temps? [What feelings will ever fill the non-existent existence of the men of our time?] The book was not written in French. I am pretty sure that was a quote. The funny thing is that I’ve never found the quote anywhere. I’ve never asked him about it. However, the question is timely, which is why I mention it.

4. What inspires you to write?

Pain, love, devastation. I answered this question in another interview. Nothing has changed.

5. What, in your view constitutes poetry?

I do not know what constitutes poetry. Yet I learned from Socrates what enables us to write poetry. I am quoting now: “I decided that it was not wisdom that enabled poets to write their poetry, but a kind of instinct or inspiration, such as you find in seers and prophets who deliver all their sublime messages without knowing in the least what they mean.”

6. Where, in your view does poetry end and prose begin?

I do not know where poetry ends, and prose begins.

Some people argue that poetry utilizes the language for its aesthetic and evocative qualities in order to hide real feelings. Antithetically, it is argued
that the banal language is used to write prose, i.e. to tell a story. I disagree on both counts.

I quoted Socrates when it came to poetry. I am going to quote my favorite novelist, Lawrence Durrell, when it comes to writing a book: “A novel should be an act of divination by entrails, not a careful record of a game of pat-ball on some vicarage lawn!”

7. Do you prefer to write in free verse or rhyme? If you have a preference, please can you explain it?

I have absolutely no preference. Good poetry is good poetry. I write in both.

8. Could you share a poem or other written composition with my readers, please?

Meadows where trees sleep, and rivers stretch like cats.
Fairies dance tarantella in the air.
Your purple lips reflect the shadows of the women you will love.
Memories.
Your eyes as thirsty as the surface of the moon.
Sandy dunes.

9. Do you have any advice for people who would like to write but are not sure how to start doing so?

I hate to advise anybody except for my students. Most people who think they advise others end up lecturing them. It’s terrible. All I am going to say here is that there is always a way. Those who want to find it will find it.

Is there anything else you would like to add?

Kevin, I want to thank you again for your kindness. It means a lot to me. Equally I want to thank everyone who reads this interview and wish them a fruitful journey in the world of writing.

ASSISTED SUICIDE # TRIGGER WARNING

This is a powerful poem. Whatever your views are on “assisted suicide”, I recommend reading Lorraine’s post. I am torn on the issue. As a liberal (with a small) I feel, in the final analysis that it is not the job of the state, society, the family (or anyone else) to tell (or pressure) another human being into taking what is, quite literally, a life and death decision. But, when a person is in extreme pain and wishes to die, I am not sure that I have the right to deny that “release” to the one who fervently wishes to escape from suffering. The whole issue of euthanasia has (quite naturally) been muddied by the horrendous activities of Nazi Germany. In the Third Reich those with mental or physical disabilities where killed or sterilised as “life unworthy of living”/”useless eaters”. Action T-4 casts a baleful shadow over the whole debate, and the issue splits people across party and other divides. Kevin

I HAVE POSTED THIS AGAIN BECAUSE SOMEONE WISHED TO READ IT. AS I COULD NOY FIND IT IN MY BLOG POSTS I HAVE COPIED IT FROM MY WORD DOCUMNT.

ASSISTED SUICIDE. (Mirror cinquains).

Slowly
They creep up on
My exhausted spirit,
The words “assisted suicide”,
Put there
By those
Who say you are a huge burden,
A drain on family,
“It’s your duty
To go.

We can’t
Care for you now,
You are too much for us,
It’s only right that you should go,
Go now,
Quickly.
We will take you to that good place,
Soon it will be over,
Suffer no more
My dear.”

“Your words
Confuse me so,
My mind can’t take it in,
My pain is great, yet still I want
To fight.
Give me
The chance to live despite the pain,
It’s MY life still to live,
Not yours to take,
Hear me.”

“Selfish
Your words…

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