Tag Archives: the selected poems of k morris

The Joys of Legal Deposit

Please note, the below post will be of particular interest to those authors who publish in the United Kingdom.

Last week, I received an email from The Agency for the Legal Deposit Libraries which begins,

ALDL Logo

“Dear Publisher,

On behalf of the Legal Deposit Libraries, these being the Bodleian Library Oxford University, The Cambridge University Library, National Library of Scotland, National Library of Wales and Trinity College Dublin and in accordance with the Legal Deposit Libraries Act 2003 or the Irish Copyright and Related Rights Act 2000, as appropriate, …”.

The email then goes on to request that I send 5 copies of “The Selected Poems of K Morris”, to the Agency for Legal Deposit, who will forward them on to the above named libraries.

Under the relevant UK legislation, a copy should also be sent to the British Library. However I had already provided my “Selected Poems” to the British Library shortly following it’s publication in August 2019, hence I am not required to resubmit my work to the BL.

I must confess to not having any (print) copies of my “Selected Poems” in stock (other than my own personal copy). I will, therefore need to order 5 copies from Amazon to comply with the above request. Being familiar with the regulations concerning Legal Deposit I ought, of course to have ensured that I kept 5 copies to one side in order to comply with the legislation and it is a lesson to me to do so in future!

Amazon operates a print on demand (POD) model, consequently it will be easy to re-order the requisite number of copies. I do, however wish that I had thought ahead and kept 5 copies aside!

(To read more about Legal Deposit please visit this link, https://www.legaldeposit.org.uk/.

The paperback edition of my “Selected Poems” can be found here, https://www.amazon.co.uk/Selected-Poems-K-Morris/dp/1688049800/

 

A Wonderful Review of My “Selected Poems”

I was pleased to receive a wonderful review of my “Selected Poems”. To read the review please follow this link, https://echoesinanemptyroom.com/2020/10/21/the-selected-poems-of-k-morris/.

To read a free sample, or to purchase my “Selected Poems”, please go to https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07WW8WXPP/.

One of My poems Included On Dodo Modern Poets

Dodo Modern Vidpoets Logo

I am pleased to announce that my poem “The Man With the Mop” has been included on Dodo Modern Poets for September 2020. To listen to my poem (and that of the other contributors), please visit, http://dodovidpoets.blogspot.com/2020/09/virtual-dodo-3-september-2020.html.

“The Man With the Mop” can be found in “The Selected Poems of K Morris”, which can be accessed here https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07WW8WXPP/ and here https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07WW8WXPP/.

A Poem From My “Selected Poems”

The traffic noise momentarily fades.
No words,
Just the singing of birds,
And a yearning for woodland glades.

(“Indefinable” can be found in my Selected Poems”, which is available here:
https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07WW8WXPP/ (for the UK), and here https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07WW8WXPP/. (for amazon.com customers).

Mopping Up

Earlier today, I recorded my poem “The Man with the Mop”:

(“The Man with the Mop” can be found in my “Selected Poems”, which is available on Amazon, and can be found here, https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07WW8WXPP/ (for the UK), and here https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07WW8WXPP/.)

Poets Anonymous

On the evening of Friday 3 July, I spent a pleasant couple of hours participating in a poetry reading organised by Poets Anonymous on Zoom, http://www.poetsanon.org.uk/.

Poets Anonymous organises poetry readings. Prior to the pandemic these took place in and around London, (many of them in Croydon). However, since the outbreak of COVID-19 events have moved online. The group also sends out emails to interested people regarding poetry matters, including competitions and opportunities for poets to have their work featured.

I greatly enjoyed listening to other poets reading their work, and reading several of my own poems from “The Selected Poems of K Morris”, and “Light and Shade: Serious (and Not so Serious) Poems”. One of the poems read by me is entitled “In This Old Familiar Wood”, and runs thus:

“In this old, familiar wood

I take my hood

Down, just

In time for the rain.

I shall not put it up again.

Thoughts of lust,

Of lost love,

And friendship I shall retain

For a while. But this wood,

And the rain,

Shall remain.”

(“In This Old Familiar Wood” can be found in “Light and Shade: Serious (and Not so Serious) Poems”, which is available in paperback and Kindle, and can be found here, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08B37VVKV/.

Rain

I have long been a lover of the rain. It refreshes hot dirty streets and reinvigorates the seemingly dead vegetation.

The below poem came to me as I lay in bed listening to the rain drumming on my window pane. It can be found in my “Selected Poems”, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07WW8WXPP/.

A Recording Of Me Reading A Poem From My “Selected Poems”

This poem is included in my “Selected Poems”. “The Selected Poems of K Morris” can be found here

(for the UK), and here

(for amazon.com customers).

10 of the Most Accessible Poets in English Literature

On 30 May, the blog Interesting Literature published a post entitled “10 of the most accessible poets in English Literature”, https://wp.me/p2WHCx-5Bm.

Amongst the poets mentioned are some of my own favourites, including Philip Larkin, the American poet Emily Dickinson, and Thomas Hardy.

Below are links to a selection of my favourite poems by Larkin, Dickinson and Hardy.

“Aubade” by Philip Larkin. Read by the poet himself, Aubade is a powerful examination of the poet’s fear of death, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IDr_SRhJs80

“Because I Could Not Stop for Death” by Emily Dickinson. Unlike Larkin in “Aubade” Dickinson does not see death as a threat which does, I think stem from her deep religious faith, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Am5O8_iCpmg

“The Darkling Thrush” by Thomas Hardy. Hardy’s bleak mood is contrasted with that of the joyful singing of an “aged thrush”, which causes the poet to ponder on how the bird can see “some blessed hope whereof he knew and I was unaware”, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QGY3DZH85O8

Should poetry be accessible? Certainly any poet who deliberately writes to be inaccessible would be a very strange creature indeed. However what is accessible to one is not accessible to another as, to some extent accessibility is in the eye of the beholder.

Poets also need to be cognisant of the danger of patronising (talking down to) their readers. Whilst working on my forthcoming poetry collection, I considered the need for footnotes. This question arose as in 4 instances I reference the work of long dead poets. My initial view was that anyone with access to Google (please note that other search engines are available)! could easily ascertain details of the poem/poet mentioned, meaning that footnotes where unnecessary. However, I came to the conclusion that adding a few footnotes was preferable to having my readers cursing me for assuming that they had knowledge not possessed by them. Consequently several footnotes appear at the end of my poems.

As to whether my work is accessible? only my readers can answer that question. And different readers will, I believe answer it differently.

(You can find my “Selected Poems” here, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07WW8WXPP/. My forthcoming collection will, I hope be available in late June/early July).

My Forthcoming Poetry Collection

On 21 August 2019, I published my “Selected Poems, (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07WW8WXPP/). The book encompasses poems composed by me between 2013-2019, and is available in both a Kindle and paperback edition.

I am delighted to announce that I shall be releasing a further collection of my poetry in June/July 2020.

As a taster, I have included below my poem “Dead Stop”, which appears in the forthcoming collection:

“Perhaps some things should not be said
In poetry,
Or maybe
They can not be said
Meaningfully by me.

As does nearly always happen
My train stopped, dead
At Clapham
(Though not for its proper, brief
Stay). We did not pull away.
What can be said
About grief
(Not experienced by me)?
Perhaps some things should not be said
In poetry.

When, that evening I came back
The track
At Clapham
Was clear.
We made good time.
Though a drear
Thought did cross my mind,
But I find
That some things can not easily be said
In rhyme
By me, as I sit here, warm
Thinking of the ajacent platform
And how our train stopped, dead,
But, perhaps some things should not be said
In poetry,
Or at least by me”.

At present my collection is untitled. Therefore, in the time between now and it’s publication I need to come up with a meaningful title for my book!

I will, of course keep you updated on the books progress here.

Kevin