Tag Archives: horology

Tuesday Morning Humour

There once was a poet named Kim
Who was both petite and slim.
Her verse it was mediocre
But a critic called Coker,
Loved that young lady Kim!

When a pretty young lady named Mable
Said, “I am both willing and able”.
I gave her a smile
And said, “wait a while,
First we must lay this table”.

There once was a horologist named Sue
Who said, “any clock will do”.
So she bought an ancient timepiece
From a disreputable old thief,
But that clock it just wouldn’t do!

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The Key to My Clock

I keep
The key
For a time
In a tray.

Will people seek
For the key
When I go away
And, perchance, finding this rhyme
Think on old Father Time
And me?

Has Time Been Called For The Traditional Clock?

I have long been a lover of the traditional and, in particular the chiming clock. My love of clocks can be seen in a number of my poems, including “My Old Clock I Wind”, which can be found in “My Old Clock I Wind and Other Poems”. One derives a real sense of seconds passing (never to return) when listening to the ponderous tick tock of a traditional pendulum clock such as a Grandfather or Grandmother clock. As I put it in my poem “Time”, “the sickle chops and the heart will, one day, stop”.

Given my love of traditional clocks, I was sad to read an article in The Telegraph in which it is reported that analogue (traditional) clocks are being replaced in school examination halls by digital devices. As one headteacher puts it:

“Malcolm Trobe, deputy general secretary at the Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL), said youngsters have become accustomed to using digital devices.
“The current generation aren’t as good at reading the traditional clock face as older generations,” he told The Telegraph.
“They are used to seeing a digital representation of time on their phone, on their computer. Nearly everything they’ve got is digital so youngsters are just exposed to time being given digitally everywhere.” (See https://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/2018/04/24/schools-removing-analogue-clocks-exam-halls-teenagers-unable/).

I remember the excitement, as a schoolboy when a large digital clock was installed in the newly constructed school building which formed a part of the Royal School for the Blind in Liverpool, (one of the schools I attended in that great city). While other children thought the device wonderful, I was left cold and would retreat to the traditional wall mounted (pendulum) clock in another (older) part of the same school.

I can, of course see the advantages of digital devices. But, to me they lack (and always will lack) that elusive thing we call character.

(You can find “My Old Clock I Wind and Other Poems” in the Amazon Kindle Store. “Time” can be found in my collection “Lost In The Labyrinth of My Mind”, which is also available in the Kindle store. Links to all of my books can be found here, https://newauthoronline.com/about/).

Time and tide wait for no man

As far back as I can remember, I have had a fascination with time. The hypnotic swing of the pendulum on an old-fashioned clock and the steady tick tock of the mechanism, entrances me.

My interest in time can be seen in several of my poems, including this one which is simply entitled “Time”

“Time” can be found in “Lost In The Labyrinth Of My Mindhttp://moyhill.com/lost/.

The Timeless Power of Public Clocks

Ever since I can remember, clocks have held a fascination for me. As a child I would sit entranced listening to the ticking of a wall mounted or grandfather clock, The hypnotic tick tock combined with the movement of the pendulum transporting me to another world.

During my career I have worked in Westminster, and when the office windows where open, and the wind was in the right direction, the chimes of Big Ben reached my ears, . I feel lucky to have heard this historic timepiece, not merely on news broadcasts but also during my time working in Westminster.

Given my interest in clocks, I was pleased to come across David K. Leff’s essay, ”The Timeless Power of Public Clocks”, in which the author discusses the enduring hold communal timepieces exert over us.

In my recently published collection of poetry, “My Old Clock I Wind”, the passing of time is (as suggested by the title) a key theme running through the book. “My Old Clock” is available (in ebook format) from Amazon and can be found HERE.

It is also available from the publisher in both print and electronic formats and can be found here, http://moyhill.com/clock/.

For a recording of me reading the title poem “My Old Clock I Wind” please visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bG-TzllCqkg.