Touching Words

To hold one’s own book is a wonderful feeling. The tangible representation of one’s endeavours writ large. For most authors the pleasure is enhanced by the ability to read the print editions of their works. However, for me as a blind author (who is unable to read print) the situation is rather more complex. I can read ebooks using the text to speech facility on my Kindle. I can not, however read the print edition of my book, “Dalliance; A Collection Of Poetry And Prose” which sits on the bookcase in my living room. While I still derive pleasure from taking the print edition of “Dalliance” in to my hands, it is not the same as being able to sit in an armchair, flick through the pages and pause at random to read a poem.
I got round the above issue by getting the Royal National Institute Of Blind People (RNIB) to transcribe “Dalliance” from the electronic file held on my computer in to braille allowing me to possess an accessible (physical) copy of my work. Yesterday I sent the electronic file of my latest collection of poetry, “Lost In The Labyrinth Of My Mind” through to the RNIB. I await the braille edition’s arrival with eager anticipation! While I am a huge fan of ebooks there is, in my opinion no substitute for their physical counterparts.

Kevin

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6 thoughts on “Touching Words

  1. PorterGirl

    Holding one’s own book is indeed a very special thing. I am very much enjoying your latest, by the way – Lost In The Labyrinth Of My Mind – I hope the braille edition is equally as delightful for you!

    Reply
      1. Let's CUT the Crap!

        After your post about this, it sound the same as the rest of us seeing writers holding and running our hands over our paper copies.
        I appreciate the explanation. I would have no clue otherwise.

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